Sara and Albert Reuben Partners in Health Education

Sara and Albert Reuben Partners in Health Education is the education arm of Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky.  As your Partner in Health Education, we provide education about sexuality and reproductive health.  Our goal is to conduct programs that empower people to develop a broader understanding of human sexuality and make healthy, responsible decisions.

We believe that:

  • Sexuality is an essential lifelong part of being human; it should be celebrated with openness and mutual respect.
  • Sexuality education should provide complete information so that people can make healthy decisions for themselves.
  • Everyone deserves information that is:
    • medically-accurate
    • complete and comprehensive
    • culturally sensitive
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Association of Reproductive Health Professionals

https://www.arhp.org/

ARHP Mission, Values, & Core Competence
ARHP Mission

The Association of Reproductive Health Professionals (ARHP) transforms and improves sexual and reproductive health care and access through health professional training and advocacy.
Core Values

We are inherently:

Driven by science. Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care and policy must be informed by high quality research.
Person-centered. SRH care should address an individual’s physical, social, mental, and spiritual health needs as interrelated and complex contributors to overall health.

We believe:

Health care is a right. Health care is a social justice issue and should be accessible to everyone, everywhere. Culturally competent and high-quality health care should uphold an individual’s sexual and reproductive autonomy, which includes the right to make uncoerced decisions regarding sex, pregnancy, parenting, abortion, and contraception.
Diversity and inclusion strengthens. We celebrate and respect diversity, and seek opportunities to foster diversity and ensure inclusion across our team and in our work. Diversity reflects the entire range of human experience and expression, such as: age, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, ability, race, sexual orientation, religion, national origin, socioeconomic status, HIV status, and immigration status.

We are committed to:

Open-access, evidence-based information. Health professionals, patients, and communities are best served when everyone has access to free and evidence-based resources and continuing education.
Inspiring, connecting, and collaborating. ARHP brings different stakeholders together to form synergistic alliances that advance SRH care and policy.
Promoting team-based health care. Health care works best when it is collaborative and team members are supported and encouraged to contribute to their fullest potential.
Applying imagination and innovation to our work. We seek creative, novel strategies to provide continuing education for health professionals and improve health care delivery models.

Core Competencies

ARHP’s core competence is planning and executing high quality clinical education for health professionals and developing policy and advocacy activities in support of these efforts.

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
Receive eAlerts | Job Board | Partner w/ARHP
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Reproductive Health Topics Publications & Resources Professional Education Newsroom Membership Policy & Advocacy About Us
About ARHP
Reproductive Health Topics
About ARHP
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CPD Mission
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Staff Directory

Member Service Center
membership@arhp.org
(202) 466-3825

Kaitlyn Borysiewicz
Education and Communications Associate
(202) 378-0515
kborysiewicz@arhp.org

Shannon Darlington
Accountant and Human Resources Coordinator
(202) 466-3825
sdarlington@arhp.org

Shontelle Dixon
Program Manager
(202) 466-3825
sdixon@arhp.org

Alayna Florman, MS
Associate Director of Development
(202) 379-5462
aflorman@arhp.org

Megan Keeling
Education Consultant
(202) 466-3825
mkeeling@arhp.org

Jessica Monmaney
Senior Education Associate
JMonmaney@ARHP.org

Amber Powell
Membership and Executive Assistant
(202) 375-3820
APowell@arhp.org

Doris Quintanilla
Education Program Manager
DQuintanilla@ARHP.org

Rebecca Sager
Director of Development
(202) 390-8495
rsager@arhp.org

Wayne C. Shields
President and CEO
(202) 489-8611
wshields@arhp.org

Melissa Werner
Director of Education
mwerner@arhp.org

All site content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs License.

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals – East
1300 19th Street, NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 466-3825 | ARHP@arhp.org
Association of Reproductive Health Professionals – West
1330 Broadway, Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 96412
(202) 466-3825 | ARHP@arhp.org
Looking for medically accurate, up-to-date, evidence-based educational programming for health care providers and materials for patients on all reproductive health topics, including abortion, contraception, HPV, menopause, menstruation, pregnancy, sexuality? Look no further than the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals (ARHP) – the leading source for trusted medical education and information on reproductive and sexual health.
Privacy Statement | Terms & Conditions

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
Receive eAlerts | Job Board | Partner w/ARHP
Events Calendar | Join ARHP | Support ARHP
Reproductive Health Topics Publications & Resources Professional Education Newsroom Membership Policy & Advocacy About Us
Board of Directors
Reproductive Health Topics
About ARHP
Board of Directors
Clinical Advisory Committee
Position Statements
Support ARHP
Job Board
Contact Us
Sign up for eAlerts
Member Code of Ethics

Send To A Friend Send To A Friend Bookmark this Page Share this page
Board of Directors
Executive Committee

Justine Wu, MD, MPH
Chair
Associate Chair
Assistant Professor
Department of Family Medicine
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI

Amy J. Levi, CNM, WHNP-BC, PhD, FACNM, FAAN
Incoming Chair
Albers Endowed Professor of Midwifery
University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Albuquerque, NM

Linda Burdette, MPAS, PA-C
Secretary
Physician Assistant
Central Cascade Women’s Health
Yakima, WA

Kandy Richards
Treasurer
Director of Finance
Wasatch Homeless Health Care
Salt Lake City, UT

Wayne C. Shields
President and CEO
Association of Reproductive Health Professionals (ARHP)
Washington, DC

Directors At Large

Nerys Benfield, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Montefiore Medical Center

Joyce Cappiello, PhD, FNP, FAANP
Assistant Professor
University of New Hampshire

Don Downing, RPh
Endowed Clinical Professor
Institute for Innovative Pharmacy Practice (I2P2)

Mark Hathaway, MD, MPH
Director of OB/GYN Outreach Services
Washington Hospital Center
Washington, DC

Lisa Maldonado, MA, MPH
Executive Director
Reproductive Health Access Project
New York, NY

Versie Johnson-Mallard, PhD, MSN, WHNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN
Associate Professor
Department of Family, Community, and Health System Science
University of South Florida
Tampa, FL

Grace Shih, MD, MAS
Acting Assistant Professor
University of Washington, Department of Family Medicine
Seattle, WA

Anna Small, MSN, JD, CNM, CHC
Corporate Director for Compliance
Shriners Hospitals for Children

All site content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs License.

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals – East
1300 19th Street, NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 466-3825 | ARHP@arhp.org
Association of Reproductive Health Professionals – West
1330 Broadway, Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 96412
(202) 466-3825 | ARHP@arhp.org
Looking for medically accurate, up-to-date, evidence-based educational programming for health care providers and materials for patients on all reproductive health topics, including abortion, contraception, HPV, menopause, menstruation, pregnancy, sexuality? Look no further than the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals (ARHP) – the leading source for trusted medical education and information on reproductive and sexual health.
Privacy Statement | Terms & Conditions

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
Receive eAlerts | Job Board | Partner w/ARHP
Events Calendar | Join ARHP | Support ARHP
Reproductive Health Topics Publications & Resources Professional Education Newsroom Membership Policy & Advocacy About Us
Clinical Advisory Committee
Reproductive Health Topics
About ARHP
Board of Directors
Clinical Advisory Committee
Position Statements
Support ARHP
Job Board
Contact Us
Sign up for eAlerts
Member Code of Ethics

Send To A Friend Send To A Friend Bookmark this Page Share this page
Clinical Advisory Committee
The Clinical Advisory Committee provides clinical expertise to enhance the quality of ARHP’s educational activities, support ARHP’s education staff members on specific programs, and develop recommendations to the board of directors for long-term educational strategies that enhance ARHP’s mission to improve the quality of sexual and reproductive health care in clinical settings. Members of this committee are appointed by ARHP’s Board of Directors to serve two-year terms based on their clinical expertise and commitment to ARHP’s educational mission.

Nerys Benfield, MD, MPH
Chair
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Montefiore Medical Center, Division of Family Planning and Global Women’s Health
Ryan Residency Training Program

Pelin Batur, MD
Cleveland Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine

Diane J. Horvath-Cosper, MD, MPH
Family Planning Fellow, MedStar Washington Hospital Center

Don Downing, RPh
University of Washington School of Pharmacy

Hollis Forster, RNC, NP
Planned Parenthood Shasta Pacific

Michael Hertz, MD, MPH
Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Chris Knutson, MS, ARNP, RN-C

Antonella Lavelanet, DO, JD, MPH

Aisha Mays, MD
Native American Health Center
University of California San Francisco, Department of Family and Community Medicine

Monica R. McLemore, PhD, MPH, RN
Assistant Professor, Family Health Care Nursing Department
Associate Director, Community Engaged Research, UCSF Preterm Birth Initiative, University of California, San Francisco
Research Scientist, Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH) University of California, San Francisco

Anne Moore, DNP, WHNP/ANP-BC, FAANP
Private Practice
Nashville, TN

Patricia Murphy, CNM, DrNP, FACNM, FAAN
University of Utah School of Nursing, Anne Poulson Cumming Presidential Endowed Chair in Women’s and Reproductive Health

Beth Mynett, MD
District of Columbia Department of Corrections, Office of Health Services Administration

Erica Pettigrew, MD, JD, MPH
Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine Physician, North Carolina

Dave Turok, MD, MPH
University of Utah, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology & Family and Preventative Medicine

Emily Wolf-Roubatis, RN
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Sandy Worthington, MSN, WHNP-BC, CNM

All site content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-NoDerivs License.

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals – East
1300 19th Street, NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036
(202) 466-3825 | ARHP@arhp.org
Association of Reproductive Health Professionals – West
1330 Broadway, Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 96412
(202) 466-3825 | ARHP@arhp.org
Looking for medically accurate, up-to-date, evidence-based educational programming for health care providers and materials for patients on all reproductive health topics, including abortion, contraception, HPV, menopause, menstruation, pregnancy, sexuality? Look no further than the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals (ARHP) – the leading source for trusted medical education and information on reproductive and sexual health.
Privacy Statement | Terms & Conditions

Center for Sexual Pleasure and Health

 

 

  • 401.489.5513
  • 250 Main St #1 Pawtucket, RI 02860
  • Tuesday-Friday: 12 to 6pm & by appointment
 

Our Values

Cultural Inclusivity

The CSPH recognizes that privilege and access have heavily influenced the prominence of primarily white, cisgender, heterosexual, Judeo-Christian, socioeconomically advantaged voices in the field of sexuality (and US society in general).  For us, being culturally inclusive is to conscientiously seek out materials, resources, and consultants that represent a wider swath of experiences and identities than are present in our current staff and network. Beyond representation, The CSPH strives toward cultural inclusion by critically analyzing the dominant representation of white, middle-class, cis, hetero samples in research and best practice development. By practicing cultural inclusion, The CSPH works to hold space for a wide array of cultural identities to be represented in our work and the field of sexuality on a larger scale.

Sex Positive

We believe that everyone should be able to consensually explore and express their sexual identities (which include sexual orientations, sexual behaviors, gender identities, relationship styles, and sexual preferences) both publicly and privately, without outside pressure or coercion. The CSPH advocates for ongoing education and open discourse about all aspects of sex and sexuality, trying to decrease stigmas against expressing sexual pleasure and desire. We stress that no form of sexual activity should ever be considered “essential” or “positive” for everyone, recognizing that sex has the potential to be empowering and natural, but sexual experiences are not universally identical. While individuals define their own sexual preferences as they see fit, personal preferences should not affect the ability to celebrate alternate sexual choices between other consenting adults. The CSPH believes in providing a safe and positive space where people can comfortably learn about all aspects of sexuality, and use this knowledge to help them  navigate whatever sexual decisions they make for themselves.

Feminist

The CSPH strongly advocates for gender equity, and against any societal force which disadvantages women. We believe feminism must be 100% inclusive of the trans community, and should not define womanhood solely in terms of physical features. We take an intersectional approach to feminism, which understands that the consequences of gender discrimination are often different for women of different ethnicities, social classes, and backgrounds. By remaining aware that trans women and women of color are currently underrepresented in the fields of sex education and feminism, we try to be as inclusive as possible in our work, but know that more work still needs to be done.

Pro-LGBTQIA Rights

The CSPH believes in the full equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and gender non-conforming, queer, intersex, and asexual individuals. We support the right of all people to live free from oppression, discrimination, and marginalization based on sex, sexual orientation and behavior, gender identity, and gender expression.We further understand the importance of having allies in the movement for LGBTQIA rights. The Center acknowledges that the LGBTQIA community is not one unified whole and that folks within it are disadvantaged in different ways. We recognize the need for LGBTQIA representation in the media, government, healthcare, and education systems and we work to ensure our resources and services are accessible to these communities. At the CSPH, we strive to create a space that is mindful of the struggles and experiences of LGBTQIA people and we respect the names, pronouns, and identities of all individuals.

Pro-Reproductive Justice and Pro-Choice

The CSPH believes that all people should have access to comprehensive information, resources, and support around their reproductive health, while acknowledging that that is not the experience for many people. We affirm the right for individuals to make personal decisions about pregnancy and contraception, and do not support restrictive governmental controls that seek to cut down on reproductive care, providers, and options. Choices about a person’s bodily autonomy and reproduction should center around that person’s needs and experiences. We affirm people’s ability to make the best choices for their circumstances. This includes being able to build families of whatever structure fits a person’s life and the right to see those families grow and thrive. We also recognize that none of these choices happen in a vacuum, and that decisions are impacted by someone’s communities, resources, and identities. The CSPH believes in using a reproductive justice framework (a term coined by SisterSong and, broadly, communities of color) to acknowledge the relationship between reproductive issues and social justice issues overall. We encourage others to visit the SisterSong  website linked above to learn more about this framework and the multiple ways reproductive oppression shows up in society.

Pro-Sex Worker Rights

The CSPH believes people have the right to control their own bodies and as such, advocates for decriminalization in order to ensure personal autonomy and safety for sex workers. We recognize that there are fundamental differences between sex work and  human trafficking in which people are forced or coerced to perform sex work. Within sex work itself, there are differences between those who freely and willingly exchange money, goods, and/or services for erotic labor, and survival sex work, where one engages in erotic labor specifically to meet their basic needs. We also acknowledge that people may move between these categories over time and/or experience trafficking while also engaged in sex work.  It is important to understand the differences between human trafficking and sex work in order to combat human trafficking and ensure that sex workers are safe and valued in the jobs that they work. Decriminalizing sex work ensures that sex workers are more likely to disclose their employment to medical providers (ensuring better health care) and to report abuse (being assaulted, abused, or robbed) to relevant support systems, be they law enforcement, care services, and/or other community members. We support the rights of sex workers to access informed medical services, have the ability to report violence, and be free from harassment and threats. The CSPH believes that basic labor rights should apply to all sectors of the sex work industry so that all workers may be protected.

Body-Positive

The CSPH recognizes and respects that many people have complex relationships with their bodies. As such, we strive to ensure our resources are representative and inclusive of a variety of body types. We understand the harm that can be caused by the lack of body diversity in the media and as a result of incessant messages that tell people their bodies aren’t good enough. We don’t follow the notion that only some bodies are valuable, but instead celebrate the nuances and uniqueness of all sizes, shapes, colors, features, and abilities.

Kink/BDSM-Friendly

The CSPH supports a nuanced understanding of BDSM, kinks, and fetishes which places primary importance on full consent, safety, and awareness of risks. We recognize that it is important to examine the roots of people’s kinks and understand how they may be influenced by social pressures, particularly ones regarding gender and race; we encourage this kind of self-examination without creating additional stigmas against the idea of being kinky in general.

Anti-Racist

The CSPH does not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, skin color, or cultural background. Beyond blatant racism, however, we also strive to address the sexualities of a diverse range of communities that are currently underrepresented in education, media, and academia. Sexuality issues impact different racial and ethnic communities in different ways, and responsible sexuality education must be aware of how racial stereotypes add to the problematization of people’s sexual identities. The CSPH is dedicated to promoting diverse intersectional research in sexuality, being an active listener and ally to marginalized groups, and holding ourselves responsible for educating ourselves and making appropriate amends if we make a mistake, whether or not it is called out by others.

Anti-Ableist

The CSPH supports full rights and inclusion for people with disabilities, whether they are physical, cognitive, developmental, and/or emotional; acquired and/or from birth; visible and/or hidden. We believe that people with disabilities have the right to full participation in decisions and actions around their sexuality. We do not support the idea that people with disabilities are somehow angelic, deviant, non-sexual, incapable or inspirational just by merit of living with a disability. Rather The CSPH recognizes the complexity of character inherent in all people and works to further sexual freedom and access for all people.

Pro-Economic Justice

The CSPH believes that sexuality education is a fundamental human right, not a commodity. We work tirelessly to promote free access to quality sex education, as well as accessible professional training for those interested in pursuing a career in sexuality. Wherever possible, we provide discounted prices for those who cannot afford our services and we strongly advocate for standardized, living-wage compensation for all sexuality professionals.  We reject the notion that there is a scarcity of work in the sexuality field when the world largely cannot access quality sex education. Long term, The CSPH envisions a field of sexuality that is organized, professional, and accessible with a rank and file strong enough to bring sex education to everyone.

Strategic Framework 2016-2019

VISION

The CSPH envisions a world where pleasure is viewed as an integral part of sexual health and people can engage in open dialogue about sexuality without fear or shame. We work toward a society that values personal autonomy and sexual health equity for everyone.

MISSION

The mission of the CSPH is to advance culturally inclusive, medically accurate, and pleasure informed sexuality education, therapy, and professional training. We provide the sex education you deserve.

VALUES

Culturally Inclusive

The CSPH recognizes that privilege and access have heavily influenced the prominence of primarily white, cisgender, heterosexual, Judeo-Christian, socioeconomically advantaged voices in the field of sexuality (and US society in general).  For us, being culturally inclusive is to conscientiously seek out materials, resources, and consultants that represent a wider swath of experiences and identities than are present in our current staff and network. Beyond representation, The CSPH strives toward cultural inclusion by critically analyzing the dominant representation of white, middle-class, cis, hetero samples in research and best practice development. By practicing cultural inclusion, The CSPH works to hold space for a wide array of cultural identities to be represented in our work and the field of sexuality on a larger scale.

Sex-Positive

We believe that everyone should be able to consensually explore and express their sexual identities (which include sexual orientations, sexual behaviors, gender identities, relationship styles, and sexual preferences) both publicly and privately, without outside pressure or coercion. The CSPH advocates for ongoing education and open discourse about all aspects of sex and sexuality, trying to decrease stigmas against expressing sexual pleasure and desire. We stress that no form of sexual activity should ever be considered “essential” or “positive” for everyone, recognizing that sex has the potential to be empowering and natural, but sexual experiences are not universally identical. While individuals define their own sexual preferences as they see fit, personal preferences should not affect the ability to celebrate alternate sexual choices between other consenting adults. The CSPH believes in providing a safe and positive space where people can comfortably learn about all aspects of sexuality, and use this knowledge to help them  navigate whatever sexual decisions they make for themselves.

Feminist

The CSPH strongly advocates for gender equity, and against any societal force which disadvantages women. We believe feminism must be 100% inclusive of the trans community, and should not define womanhood solely in terms of physical features. We take an intersectional approach to feminism, which understands that the consequences of gender discrimination are often different for women of different ethnicities, social classes, and backgrounds. By remaining aware that trans women and women of color are currently underrepresented in the fields of sex education and feminism, we try to be as inclusive as possible in our work, but know that more work still needs to be done.

Pro- LGBTQIA Rights

The CSPH believes in the full equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and gender non-conforming, queer, intersex, and asexual individuals. We support the right of all people to live free from oppression, discrimination, and marginalization based on sex, sexual orientation and behavior, gender identity, and gender expression.We further understand the importance of having allies in the movement for LGBTQIA rights. The Center acknowledges that the LGBTQIA community is not one unified whole and that folks within it are disadvantaged in different ways. We recognize the need for LGBTQIA representation in the media, government, healthcare, and education systems and we work to ensure our resources and services are accessible to these communities. At the CSPH, we strive to create a space that is mindful of the struggles and experiences of LGBTQIA people and we respect the names, pronouns, and identities of all individuals.

Pro-Reproductive Justice and Pro-Choice

The CSPH believes that all people should have access to comprehensive information, resources, and support around their reproductive health, while acknowledging that that is not the experience for many people. We affirm the right for individuals to make personal decisions about pregnancy and contraception, and do not support restrictive governmental controls that seek to cut down on reproductive care, providers, and options. Choices about a person’s bodily autonomy and reproduction should center around that person’s needs and experiences. We affirm people’s ability to make the best choices for their circumstances. This includes being able to build families of whatever structure fits a person’s life and the right to see those families grow and thrive. We also recognize that none of these choices happen in a vacuum, and that decisions are impacted by someone’s communities, resources, and identities. The CSPH believes in using a reproductive justice framework (a term coined by SisterSong and, broadly, communities of color) to acknowledge the relationship between reproductive issues and social justice issues overall. We encourage others to visit the SisterSong  website linked above to learn more about this framework and the multiple ways reproductive oppression shows up in society.

Pro- Sex Worker Rights

The CSPH believes people have the right to control their own bodies and as such, advocates for decriminalization in order to ensure personal autonomy and safety for sex workers. We recognize that there are fundamental differences between sex work and  human trafficking in which people are forced or coerced to perform sex work. Within sex work itself, there are differences between those who freely and willingly exchange money, goods, and/or services for erotic labor, and survival sex work, where one engages in erotic labor specifically to meet their basic needs. We also acknowledge that people may move between these categories over time and/or experience trafficking while also engaged in sex work.  It is important to understand the differences between human trafficking and sex work in order to combat human trafficking and ensure that sex workers are safe and valued in the jobs that they work. Decriminalizing sex work ensures that sex workers are more likely to disclose their employment to medical providers (ensuring better health care) and to report abuse (being assaulted, abused, or robbed) to relevant support systems, be they law enforcement, care services, and/or other community members. We support the rights of sex workers to access informed medical services, have the ability to report violence, and be free from harassment and threats. The CSPH believes that basic labor rights should apply to all sectors of the sex work industry so that all workers may be protected

Body Positive

The CSPH recognizes and respects that many people have complex relationships with their bodies. As such, we strive to ensure our resources are representative and inclusive of a variety of body types. We understand the harm that can be caused by the lack of body diversity in the media and as a result of incessant messages that tell people their bodies aren’t good enough. We don’t follow the notion that only some bodies are valuable, but instead celebrate the nuances and uniqueness of all sizes, shapes, colors, features, and abilities.

Kink/BDSM Friendly

The CSPH supports a nuanced understanding of BDSM, kinks, and fetishes which places primary importance on full consent, safety, and awareness of risks. We recognize that it is important to examine the roots of people’s kinks and understand how they may be influenced by social pressures, particularly ones regarding gender and race; we encourage this kind of self-examination without creating additional stigmas against the idea of being kinky in general.

Anti-Racist

The CSPH does not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, skin color, or cultural background. Beyond blatant racism, however, we also strive to address the sexualities of a diverse range of communities that are currently underrepresented in education, media, and academia. Sexuality issues impact different racial and ethnic communities in different ways, and responsible sexuality education must be aware of how racial stereotypes add to the problematization of people’s sexual identities. The CSPH is dedicated to promoting diverse intersectional research in sexuality, being an active listener and ally to marginalized groups, and holding ourselves responsible for educating ourselves and making appropriate amends if we make a mistake, whether or not it is called out by others.

Anti-Ableist

The CSPH supports full rights and inclusion for people with disabilities, whether they are physical, cognitive, developmental, and/or emotional; acquired and/or from birth; visible and/or hidden. We believe that people with disabilities have the right to full participation in decisions and actions around their sexuality. We do not support the idea that people with disabilities are somehow angelic, deviant, non-sexual, incapable or inspirational just by merit of living with a disability. Rather The CSPH recognizes the complexity of character inherent in all people and works to further sexual freedom and access for all people.

Pro-Economic Justice

The CSPH believes that sexuality education is a fundamental human right, not a commodity. We work tirelessly to promote free access to quality sex education, as well as accessible professional training for those interested in pursuing a career in sexuality. Wherever possible, we provide discounted prices for those who cannot afford our services and we strongly advocate for standardized, living-wage compensation for all sexuality professionals.  We reject the notion that there is a scarcity of work in the sexuality field when the world largely cannot access quality sex education. Long term, The CSPH envisions a field of sexuality that is organized, professional, and accessible with a rank and file strong enough to bring sex education to everyone.

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES & GOALS

Priority A: Reduce Sexual Shame

  1. Affirm both individual and community rights to pursue self-identified sexual wellness and satisfaction.
  2. Provide mental health support and opportunities for people to heal from trauma and sexual shame.
  3. Normalize the wide diversity of  identities, relationships, experiences, and behaviors that exist.

Priority B: Elevate Comprehensive Sexuality Education

  1. Provide welcoming and accessible spaces and opportunities for people to receive culturally inclusive, medically accurate, and pleasure informed  sex education.
  2. Educate adjacent fields and allied health professionals (e.g. social workers, medical providers, school based educators) on sexuality to improve their practices.
  3. Promote comprehensive sexuality education through social media and other digital platforms.
  4. Amplify the voices of historically underrepresented communities through The CSPH platform.

Priority C: Support the Growth of the Sexuality Field

  1. Shift societal attitudes to recognize and financially support pleasure-inclusive sex education as a valuable and necessary service.
  2. Develop and support new leaders in the sexuality field who share and advocate for The CSPH’s values.
  3. Model best business practices, high ethical standards, and active allyship and accountability congruent with The CSPH values.
  4. Increase representation of diverse communities  in the sexuality field by promoting broader access and visibility for emerging sexuality professionals.

PROGRAMS & SERVICES

The CSPH accomplishes its mission in the following ways:

Board of Directors

Join our board!

erica-headshot-2016Erica Busillo Adams

Chair

Erica is a passionate change maker and non-profit leader who has built her career working for incredible organizations like The Philadelphia Orchestra, Save The Bay, and The Autism Project, where she is currently the Director of Development. Erica is also the Co-Founder and CEO of (step)mom: v, a website, blog, and lifestyle brand for (step)moms, and in addition to The CSPH, sits on the Board of Directors of Fusionworks Dance Company. Erica was selected as an “Emerging Nonprofit Leader” by the Rhode Island Foundation in 2014. When not geeking-out about the non-profit sector or how amazing The CSPH is, you can find Erica performing dance improvisation at the Fringe PVD festival, attending a PVD Lady Project event, frequenting museums of all kinds, sampling one of RI’s many fine eating establishments, or hopping a plane to her next destination. Erica studied Communications, Dance, and Comparative Religion at Northwestern U and lives in Providence with her husband, Sam, two amazing (step)daughters, a sweet and lumbering chocolate lab named Jacomo, and an ever-meowing tabby cat named Rosemary.

 

dr-lexx-0103Dr. Lexx Brown-James

Dr. Lexx (She| Her| Doctor) hails from St. Louis, MO by way of Atlanta, GA. As an educator, therapist, and sexologist she is passionate about creating and maintaining safe spaces for people of color, both personally and professionally. Dr. Lexx owns The Institute for Sexuality & Intimacy, LLC, which is an educational and therapeutic practice that primarily serves the Black and Queer communities of the St. Louis metropolitan area. As a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Dr. Lexx finds helping others cultivate healthy and sex positive relationships keeps her grounded. When not in healing with others, she loves to educate professionals about positive, safe and comprehensive sexuality.

 

Brian Flaherty

Brian Flaherty went to Tufts University where misspent the first three years of his college education pursuing an engineering degree before bailing out at the last minute and getting an English degree. He went on to work his way up through the ranks of academic law librarianship despite the conspicuous absence of a law degree. He has worked as a legal reference librarian for over 20 years; given the intersection of his personal and professional interests, he has developed a specialty in researching issues related to sex and the law. In 2006 he helped incorporate Partners in Sex Education, a non-profit in the Greater Boston area dedicated to educating young people in schools, juvenile detention facilities and other youth organizations. He currently works as a librarian at New England Law | Boston, and as director of development and administrative factotum for Partners in Sex Education in Newton.

 

hintze-headshotJustyn Hintze

Justyn Hintze is an advocate for breaking binaries, and just breaking stereotypes. She has an MEd in Human Sexuality from Widener University, and is a sexologist, educator, writer, pleasure revolutionary, and public speaker. Justyn is passionate about eliminating discrimination, and creating safer spaces to foster open, raw conversations.

A sexuality educator and curriculum writer at Lotus Blooms, Justyn advocates for age-appropriate, medically accurate, pleasure-based comprehensive sex ed. Justyn is on the Advisory Council for the Woodhull Freedom Foundation, and is on the Governing Committee as a Board Member for the Center for Sexual Pleasure and Health. Justyn is also the Digital Strategist at Rad Campaign, a full-agency web development company campaigning for socially conscious nonprofits, and the Strategist for Women Who Tech, championing women in technology and helping to fund women-led startups in the US and abroad.

Justyn authors curriculum on intimacy, gender, and pleasure, and is a guest writer for KinklyFrogloop, and Teaching Sex Ed, to name a few. She facilitates panels and workshops at conferences and in classrooms nationwide.

Follow Justyn on Twitter: @justynashley

 

Ben Lasserre

Bio & Headshot Coming Soon

 

 

madelinesquarelowres-web1Madeline Montgomery

Madeline Montgomery holds an MPH with a concentration in Violence Studies and a BA in Anthropology with a minor in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Madeline’s introduction to the fields of public health and advocacy included HIV counseling and testing, peer sexual health education, and sexual violence survivor advocacy in college, followed by a year of AmeriCorps service  at the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence, and subsequently an academic focus on violence and gender in graduate school. She now works in HIV/STI prevention research at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, RI as her group’s resident angry queer intersectional feminist. Madeline is passionate about boosting queer and trans voices at every level of health research and care, and grateful for inspiring, healing, loving communities of advocates and activists.

In her free time, Madeline likes to spend time with the small children in her life, look for feminist subtext in tv and teen magazines, and decorate with string lights year-round.

 

 

best portraitBonnie L. Shepard

Bonnie is an independent consultant and researcher with more than 30 years of experience in program evaluation, research, and strategic planning.   She brings a gender and human rights perspective to sexual and reproductive health programs.  Through interactive methods that build staff capacity, she assists a variety of NGOs, non-profits, foundations, and international agencies to design cost-effective and user-friendly monitoring, evaluation and learning systems.   She also specializes in conducting advocacy evaluations and portfolio evaluations for foundations and donor agencies.  Based on her research and evaluations, her publications include a book of advocacy research and program case studies:  Running the Obstacle Course to Sexual and Reproductive Health: Lessons from Latin America (Praeger: 2006), as well as peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. Currently, she works as the monitoring and evaluation consultant for EMpower, a global foundation supporting programs for vulnerable youth.  She is fluent in English, Portuguese, and Spanish, with proficiency in French.   For more information on Bonnie’s professional experience, visit her website:   www.blshepardconsulting.com

 

bea-trumannBea Trumann

Bea Trumann, a giant Black-Haudenosaunee mixed femme, hails from the great northern Maine woods, and has called New York, Massachusetts, Oregon, and the Philippines home. They have spent years working in the environmental sector while maintaining a strong advocacy role with sex and reproductive justice, and is currently conducting research at the intersection of the two. Bea is a former Global Population and Environment Program Fellow, has worked as Research Assistant with The Nature Conservancy in Maine’s Diversity Program, and served with AmeriCorps’ Community HealthCorps in a large low-income health center in Syracuse, New York. Bea will soon graduate from Goddard College with a degree in Social Innovation and Sustainability, having completed extensive research and coursework focusing on environmental racism. They are a national public speaker, having spoken primarily at environmental conferences on the necessity of diversity in STEM. Bea believes strongly in normalizing larger, browner bodies in traditionally smaller, whiter spaces. Bea’s best friend is their stinky old lady boston terrier rescue, known lovingly as “Toots.”

Know an Amazing Sex Educator? Give Them An Award!

February 02, 2011

The CSPH

Do you know of an amazing sexuality educator that works for Planned Parenthood?

Nominate them for an APPLE Award!

What about a sexuality educator who provides exceptional sexuality education that works outside of Planned Parenthood? Nominate them for a MARY LEE TATUM Award!

Recognize your peers and mentors, give them the chance to get the recognition they deserve.

The Association of Planned Parenthood Leaders in Education (APPLE) Awards committee is currently accepting nominations for the 2011 awards. Nominations are due by 5 PM EST on Friday, February 11th.
Please don’t delay—turn in your nominations today!!

They can be mailed to Jill.Baker@ppmontana.org

Who Qualifies to Be Nominated? What is the APPLE Award? What is the MARY LEE TATUM Award?

Sexuality education is an essential element of the services provided by Planned Parenthood affiliates. Though affiliates differ in the type of professional training, patient education, and community education programs they offer, all seek to increase understanding of sexuality as an integral aspect of human development and to develop the ability to communicate feelings and decisions to others.

Each year at the PPFA National Conference and/or APPLE’s Drawing Water from a Deeper Well Conference, the Association of Planned Parenthood Leaders in Education (APPLE) presents awards to individuals, Vice Presidents or Directors of Education, and Affiliates that have shown outstanding leadership in education.

The APPLE Awards committee is currently seeking nominations for the 2011 awards. We know that there are many wonderful things happening in education departments across the country.
Help APPLE acknowledge the achievements of those making remarkable strides in education.


2011 Award Descriptions:

APPLE SEED Award to be given to a peer educator, adult or youth, who has demonstrated great leadership and made outstanding contributions to her/his targeted community.
Question: Describe how the nominee has met the criteria for sexuality education and training based on the ETAT standards listed below.

The Educator Trainer Assessment Tool (ETAT) espouses an approach to sexuality and reproductive health training and education which are democratic and pluralistic. We believe that, to be effective, sexuality training and education must…
• Provide a positive, comprehensive and honest perspective of human sexuality;
• Respect cultural pluralism and promote universal values;
• Respect and empower learners;
• Utilize a variety of teaching methods to address the diversity of learning styles among learners;
• Address all three learning domains: cognitive, affective and behavioral;
• Promote life-long learning about sexuality.

ETAT is adapted from Teaching About Sexuality and HIV, Joan Helmich and Evonne Hedgepeth, New York University Press, 1995.

MARY LEE TATUM Award is given to the person who best exemplifies the qualities of an ideal sexuality educator. Nominees may be from within or outside the Planned Parenthood family and may include administrators and/or managers as well as front line staff.

Question: Describe how the nominee has met the criteria for sexuality education and training based on the ETAT standards listed below.

The Educator Trainer Assessment Tool (ETAT) espouses an approach to sexuality and reproductive health training and education which are democratic and pluralistic. We believe that, to be effective, sexuality training and education must…
• Provide a positive, comprehensive and honest perspective of human sexuality;
• Respect cultural pluralism and promote universal values;
• Respect and empower learners;
• Utilize a variety of teaching methods to address the diversity of learning styles among learners;
• Address all three learning domains: cognitive, affective and behavioral;
• Promote life-long learning about sexuality.

ETAT is adapted from Teaching About Sexuality and HIV, Joan Helmich and Evonne Hedgepeth, New York University Press, 1995.

Other Awards You Can Nominate Individuals For

APPLE TREE Award is given to the Board of Directors and the President/CEO who have demonstrated outstanding support and leadership of the education and training program of their affiliate.
Question: How has this affiliate’s BOD and CEO demonstrated their commitment to supporting an outstanding education department?

APPLE ORCHARD Award is given to an education department that has risen to the occasion and served as a model of excellence for other affiliates.
The occasion may include an event, transition, innovative program, or work on public policy, social justice, cultural competency and/or other issues.
Question: How might this department’s occasion or event serve as a model for other affiliates?

GOLDEN APPLE Award is given to the VP/ Education Director of the Year for being the person who best exemplifies the highest standards of leadership.
Question: Describe the nominee’s leadership experience within her/his community, affiliate, and/or field of sexuality education during her/his lifetime.

APPLE BLOSSOM Award is given to the VP/ Education Director of less than two years who has risen quickly to the forefront with new ideas, energy, and commitment.
Question: Describe the nominee’s leadership experience within her/his community, affiliate, and/or field of sexuality education during their first two years of leadership as an Education Director.

APPLE TURNOVER Award is given to the VP/ Education Director who has met exceptional challenges with creativity and courage and/or who has survived the worst disaster.
Questions:
What was the experience, disaster, or problem the nominee encountered?
How did the nominee survive/manage this crisis?
What were the results? Please include examples/evidence of results if possible.
What makes this nominee’s experience and the way it was handled special or significant?

BIG APPLE Award to be given to an outstanding Planned Parenthood educator or trainer who spends the majority of her/his time providing direct sexuality education or training services. Those whose primary role is administrator or manager are not eligible.
Question: Describe how the nominee has met the criteria for sexuality education and training based on the ETAT standards listed below.

NOMINATION Form
2011 APPLE Awards

Award Nominated For (Circle One):
___Mary Lee Tatum ___Golden APPLE ___APPLE Blossom

___APPLE Turnover ___Big APPLE ___APPLE Seed

___APPLE Orchard ___APPLE Tree

Name of Nominee:________________________________________________________

Affiliate: ________________________________________________________________

Position:________________________________________________________________

Number of years working in sexuality education: ______

E-mail address:_________________________ Phone number: _________________

For APPLE Tree or APPLE Orchard Awards:

Affiliate:________________________________________________________________

Name of CEO:____________________________________________________________

Email Address: _______________________ Phone Number:______________________

VP/Educator Name:_______________________________________________________

Email Address:________________________ Phone Number:______________________

Nominated By:

Affiliate:________________________________________________________________

Position:________________________________________________________________

Email Address:_______________________ Phone number:_______________________

Please return completed form to Jill Baker, APPLE Award Chair, by email, Jill.Baker@ppmontana.org or fax 406.454.3433 by 5 PM EST on Friday, February 11th. The APPLE Awards committee will determine if the nominee meets the criteria listed above and present a ballot of eligible nominees to APPLE Members for a vote. The awards will be presented at the APPLE Awards Reception at the PPFA National Conference in Washington, DC in April.
Based on the award criteria and question(s) listed under the award descriptions, please provide a statement describing how the nominee meets the criteria for the award s/he was nominated for in 300 words or less. Please provide specific examples whenever possible.

Nomination Summary:

Previous Winners Include:

Mary Lee Tatum Award
1992 Peggy Brick
1993 Joycelyn Elders
1994 Brian McNaught
1995 Michael Carrera
1996 Terry Beresford
1997 Pamela Wilson
1998 Robert Selverstone
1999 Carol Cassell
2000 Susan Montfort
2001 Maggi Boyer
2002 Konstance McCaffree
2003 Deborah Roffman
2004 Wayne Pawlowski
2005 Susie Wilson and Debra Haffner
2006 Elizabeth Schroeder
2007 Jan Lunquist & Joan Garrity
2008 Barbara Kemp Huberman
2009 Joan Helmich
2010 Nora Gelprin

Golden APPLE Award
1991 Judith McKoy
1992 Jan Lunquist
1993 Wayne Pawlowski
1994 Dorel Shannon
1995 Shirley Everett-Clark
1996 Mary Greenfield
1997 Susan Powers-Alexander
1998 Patti Caldwell
1999 Eric Ramirez
2000 Catriona McHardy & Suzanne Witzenburg
2001 Kathleen Baldwin
2002 Karen Omvig
2003 Krista Anderson
2004 No award given
2005 Mark Huffman
2006 Bill Taverner
2007 Maureen Kelly
2008 Sue Keppler
2009 No award given
2010 Carole Miller

APPLE Tree Award
1991 PP of Decatur
1992 PP of the Blue Ridge
1993 No nominations
1994 PP of Central Indiana
1995 PP Mar Monte
1996 PP Centers of West Michigan
1997 No nominations
1998 PP of Santa Barbara
1999 PP of Tompkins County
2000 PP of South Palm Beach & Broward Counties
2001 PP of the Palm Beach and Treasure Coast Area
2002 PP League of Massachusetts
2003 No nominations
2004 No award given
2005 PP of Northern New England
2006 PP of Middle and Eastern Tennessee
2007 PP Western Washington
2008 PP Hawaii
2009 PP Montana
2010 PP Hudson Peconic

APPLE Blossom Award
1991 Kathleen Baldwin
1992 No nominations
1993 Cindy Joerger
1994 L. McKenzie Wren
1995 Marc Davison
1996 No award given
1997 Maureen Kelly
1998 Maria Otero
1999 Elizabeth Schroeder
2000 Bani Hines-Hudson
2001 Triste Brooks
2002 Lisa Marella & Marlene Pray
2003 Patty Kirby & Cory Neering
2004 No award given
2005 Dawn Forrester Price
2006 Carole Miller
2007 Amy Claussen & Jade Williamson
2008 Sonia Blackiston
2009 Melissa Meyer
2010 Sharon Miller

Crab APPLE Award
1991 Jean Marie Osborn
1992 Vilma Valdes
1993 Sandy Sandoval
1994 Theresa Russo
1995 No award given
1996 Pamela Place
1997 Susan Dudolski
1998 Jeannie Seay
1999 Mary Capo Blanco
2000 Julia Piercy
2001 Linda Dunn
2002 Debbie Hartridge

Award name changed to APPLE Turnover Award in 2003.
APPLE Turnover Award
2003 All Planned Parenthood Educators
2004 No award given
2005 Jamie Leonard
2006 Rob Curry
2007 Andrea Anderson
2008 No award given
2009 PP of Central Washington
2010 Cherie Seitz

Big APPLE Award
2009 Pedro Elias
2010 Cammie Bo

APPLE Orchard Award
2009 PP of South Texas
2010 PP of the Rocky Mountains

APPLE Seed Award
2009 Mackenzie Massey
2010 Caleb Kruzel

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